Thuum—Through Smoke, Comes Fire EP (2018) PREVIEW

Thuum—Through Smoke, Comes Fire EP (2018)

Thuum—Through Smoke, Comes Fire EP (2018)

Details

Self-released. Release date Monday 19 February 2018

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Band

  • Bear—Guitars and vocals
  • Andy—Guitar
  • Luke—Bass
  • Joe—Drums

Tracks

  1. Intro (instrumental)
  2. Worthless
  3. Hafgufa
  4. Through smoke, comes fire

Review

Hailing from Bournemouth, at the south end of the island, crawls Thuum with their debut EP Through Smoke, Comes Fire and it is colossal. This is already promising to be the heaviest release of 2018.

Black and white photo of the band standing in front of a stage

Thuum—They’re heavier than they look

Thuum are firmly lodged in the doom, sludge, southern-groove genre and they own it. Within four tracks Thuum manage to say more and generate more excitement than many bands with two or three times as many tracks.

Intro (instrumental)” (track 1) opens gradually, a fade up from silence. A quiet drone and a primitive-sounding chant, overplayed by a bell-like, heavily-reverbed guitar punching out a melody. And then the granite-crushing power of the track truly unleashes. It is slow and grinding but damn is it heavy and beautiful.

Worthless” (track 2) is a powerhouse of southern-infused sludge metal. Slowly meandering, bass-heavy riffs and sorrowful guitar solos provide a perfect background to Bear’s growling vocals. If you’re a fan of Down and Corrosion of Conformity you will not be disappointed. They’re like a fusion of Down and Mastodon—Mastodown, if you will.

Hafgufa” (track 3) begins with a blast of drums. then the pace is quickened for a song that winds itself around a simple, bouncing riff, that starts and stops, but never stops its unrelenting pace and heaviness. The song is cut in two with another lamenting guitar solo. “Can you hear me shouting out his name?” Bear yells—it’s reminiscent of Mastodon’s Troy Sanders. It may be the shortest song on the EP but it sure as hell packs a punch.

Through smoke, comes fire” (track 4). The title track. Another drums opening, which feels like a gentle nod of the head to Bonham’s drum sound in Led Zeppelin’s “When The Levee Breaks”. A ponderous, bass-heavy riff builds and layers for a minute until it breaks down into an ascending, walking riff. This is truly majestic. A fusion of influences, progressive and doom, always heavy but never indulgent or aggressive. Then vocals, both growling and howling. It reminded me a lot of Mastodon’s album Leviathan. The tracks meanders through a melodic, harmonic progression to a gentle conclusion.

Conclusion

Wow! This is a near-perfect debut EP. I truly hope Thuum get the attention they deserve. This is precision crafted doom/sludge metal from the deep south (of England). I want to hear more. If through smoke, comes fire, I want to see what truly happens when the fire takes hold. Definitely a band to take notice of and follow over the next few years.

Now, if you’ll excuse me. I’m going to give this 24 minutes 39 seconds offering another spin.

Review score: 98%

Disclaimer

Stampede Press UK contacted me a few weeks back, inviting me to preview this EP.

I have no connections to either Stampede Press UK or Thuum. I’m not being paid to review this. But I did get a free digital copy of the album to review—which is pretty cool.

Many thanks to Rob from Stampede Press UK, and Thuum.

PREVIEW: Haema—Insurrection EP (2017)

Haema—Insurrection EP (2017)

Haema—Insurrection EP (2017)

About

Debut EP recorded at Initiate Audio & Media by Neil Hudson (Krysthla/Gutworm).

Originally due for release in July 2017, but on 7 August Haema announced on their Facebook page that they have signed to Slipstick Records for the physical and digital worldwide distribution of this their debut EP.; see Slipstick Records for more details.

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Band

  • Jordon Calderwood—Vocals
  • Andrzej Jakubiuk—Guitar
  • Scott Stephenson—Bass
  • David Flitt—Drums

Tracks

  1. Eden
  2. Free Man
  3. Insurrection
  4. Thirte3n
  5. Two Minds

Review

So the email arrives and asks me if I’d be kind enough to review Haema’s forthcoming EP Insurrection. Sure! I’m always up for listening to new music. And then I listened to the preview. BLOODY HELL! THIS IS BRILLIANT!

Haema, a four-piece from Northamptonshire, UK, describe themselves as an experimental, industrialised, groove metal band. But that really doesn’t do them justice. Think: Rage Against the Machine meets Senser meets Circle of Dust meets Clawfinger. But heavier. Okay, let’s throw in some Fear Factory. Brilliant!

The EP opens with Eden (track 1). “What is the point of your existence?” a man asks. “To feel […] without love, without anger, without sorrow, breath is just a clock ticking.” A woman’s voice speaks above a soundscape. Then the riff kicks in. It’s tight and heavy. Jordon Calderwood’s vocals fluctuate between a Zack de la Rocha-style rap/rant and a metalcore-style bark. The song is both in your face and ponderous. There is space, plenty of space, plenty of depth and width to this song. It stops and starts and never ceases to be interesting.

Free man (track 2) rides a bouncy riff right from the get-go that morphs into a rap. “Now you can see / I’m not a puppet on a string / You know, I’m a free man…” The song is aggressive and melodic. It has an urgency and integrity that makes me believe without a shadow of a doubt that he is free.

The title track Insurrection (track 3) opens with the sound of an alarm—if Depeche Mode were in the alarm sound design business. Then a more traditional metal-style riff bursts in. It chugs along, steadily. And every time my head bounces in time to the beat. The vocals in this song remind me at times of early Mordred. There is a fragility about it, which is echoed in the guitar solo about three-quarters of the way through.

Damn! I could listen to this EP all day.

Thirte3n (track 4) is probably the most in-your-face metal track on the EP. It has a repetitive, blast-beat riff that sounds like someone is drilling through granite. The verses have this machine-gun burst riff. It’s interesting and gives the song movement. Then over the top of the carnage there is the most fragile and subtle of light melodies, like a butterfly floating across a battlefield.

The final track Two minds (track 5) is slower, more ponderous: a call and reply style riff that gives way to another RATM-style riff. It starts and. Stops. As it. Twists and turns. Following the. Rhythm of the. Vocals.

Conclusion

Haema EP coming soon

From my first play through of this extraordinary EP I’ve loved this collection of music. Sure people are going to make immediate comparisons to Rage Against The Machine and Senser, as I have done.  But that doesn’t detract from the quality of the playing, or the songwriting, or the production. Listen to the first two albums from Slayer—they wanted to be Mercyful Fate and King Diamond; Metallica played their first few years of gigs passing off Diamond Head and Budgie songs as their own until they found their own voice.

Given the chance Haema will also find their own distinct voice. But as a starting point, this is nearly perfect. I haven’t felt this excited by a not-entirely-metal release in a long time. I had the same burst of adrenaline and excitement listening to this as I did listening to Senser’s Stacked Up album in 1994. This album makes me smile and nod my head along to it for all the right reasons.

More like this please.

Review score: 100%

Bonus video

Disclaimer

In mid-June, Scott Stephenson (Haema’s bassist) contacted me inviting me to preview this EP.

I have no connections to Haema or any related companies or individuals; although I am a big fan of producer Neil Hudson’s previous work. I’m not being paid to review this.

Many thanks to Scott and the rest of Haema.

Stampin’ Ground—A New Darkness Upon Us (2003)

Stampin' Ground—A New Darkness upon Us (2003)

Stampin’ Ground—A New Darkness upon Us (2003)

Details

Produced, engineering, mixed and mastered by Andy Sneap. Recorded in the summer of 2003 at Backstage Productions, Derbyshire.

Encyclopaedia Metallum | Facebook

Band

  • Adam Frakes-Sime—Vocals
  • Scott Atkins—Guitar
  • Antony “Mobs” Mowbray—Guitar
  • Ian Glasper—Bass
  • Neil Hutton—Drums

Tracks

  1. A new darkness upon us (intro) (instrumental)
  2. Don’t need a reason to hate
  3. Behind the light
  4. Killer of society
  5. Dead from the neck up
  6. The cage
  7. Bear the scars
  8. Betrayal has a face
  9. Pain is weakness (leaving the body)
  10. Unmarked grave
  11. Ashes to scatter
  12. Mantra of a dying world (outro)

Review

I’m running hugely behind on reviews this autumn and for some reason I really thought  I had already written this review. Probably because I’ve listened to this album more than probably any other album I’ve reviewed during this project. It sat in my car CD player for weeks. Last.fm tells me that I’ve played 90 Stampin’ Ground tracks in the last 90 days; they are my fourth most-played band in the last six months.

This was one of those albums that hit a chord with me on my first play through. Stampin’ Ground from Cheltenham, Gloucestershire here in the UK play fusion of hardcore and thrash. Imagine Exodus, Slayer, Hatebreed and Biohazard forming a supergroup and you more or less have their sound down to a tee.

A New Darkness Upon Us (2003) is the band’s fourth, and to date, last full-length album. According to Encyclopaedia Metallum the band formed in 1995 then took a hiatus from 2006 until 2014 when they reformed. I’d definitely love to hear both their back catalogue and whatever they might release next.

Conclusion

Keeping with my tradition of writing really short reviews for the albums that I love most, I find myself writing the conclusion already.

This is an album I could listen to on repeat for days – and have done. While the album isn’t entirely perfect, I can’t but give it a full 10/10: the flaws just don’t seem important enough to quibble over. I can see me listening to this album for a long time yet.

It is discoveries like this one that makes me love this project and probably is why I am running behind on reviews (it’s currently early October): I just don’t want it to end.

Review score: 100%

Small—No Power Without Control EP (2006)

Small—No Power Without Control EP (2006)

Small—No Power Without Control EP (2006)

Details

Produced by SMALL. Engineered and mixed by Francis Caste. Mastered by Allan Douches at West West Side Studio, New York City.

Encyclopedia Metallum

Band

  • Tersim Backle—Vocals
  • Wanted—Guitars
  • Psychiatric Ward—Bass
  • Unknown—Drums

Tracks

  1. Forlorn
  2. Few drops
  3. Stray highway
  4. Wild child
  5. Influence(s)
  6. Entwined mind

Review

It’s funny how an album cover can influence your expectations of what it might sound like. This cover is white, simple, sparse with what looks like a few droplets of water on the front, and now with added fractals on the back cover. I wasn’t expecting much from the EP, to be honest.

No power without control, the only release from French metallers Small, is very much in the ballpark of Philip H Anselmo-fronted groove metal bands Pantera and Superjoint (formerly Superjoint Ritual) and I daresay is a little more consistent than the latter. Guitars and drums are tight, the bass skips along distinctively behind, and Tersim Backle’s vocals are voiced gruffly but there is depth and character to them. It all comes together very nicely.

The EP opens powerfully (and, I guess, if the title is to be believed, then also controllably) with “Forlorn” (track 1) that features a bouncing, tick-tocking riff that recurs throughout the song. The riff morphs and adapts throughout the track adding interest and variety. It’s an impressive opening.

“Few drops” (track 2) kicks off with bass and drums before a flurry of ranting vocals powers the song forward. Behind it the guitars start and stop creating space. Things slow down for a very latter-day Pantera-style riff. This is good stuff.

“Stray highway” (track 3) opens with white noise, and a slightly distorted, picked six-note riff. The song doesn’t have the same strong hooks as the first two, and is quite progressive in its rambling journey but it’s still a good track.

“Wild child” (track 4) features an interesting bendy riff that gives way to a ‘machine-gun’ riff that then morphs into a kind of metal-ska bouncing riff that powers you through the song.

“Influence(s)” (track 5) dances about for a bit with a call and answer-style riff. Then power. Barking vocals. And a twisting and turning riff that goes in stops and starts.

The final song, “Entwined mind” (track 6) has perhaps the most melodic vocals of any of the tracks on this EP, and again uses a very bouncy, almost ska-style riff that slows down and digs in every now and then into a ticking riff.

Conclusion

I’m impressed. This is one of those releases that I wish that I’d discovered months ago, simply so that I could choose to listen to it more.

It is undoubtedly influenced by Pantera and Superjoint but it is certainly not the poorer for that. In the absence of any new releases from either this is a welcome addition to my collection.

Review score: 98%

Slit—Cronaca Nera (2005)

Slit—Cronaca Nera (2005)

Slit—Cronaca Nera (2005)

Details

Recorded at Temple Studios, Malta in 2004. Mixed and produced by David Vella. Mastered by Dave Chang.

Band

  • Frank Calleja—Vocals
  • Daniel Bezzina—Guitar
  • Joker (Jo Kerr)—Basilisk
  • Gerald—Drums

Tracks

  1. [Untitled]
  2. The devil’s location
  3. 7even demons
  4. Showcase
  5. God shaped hole
  6. Myriad
  7. Stone cold, shine
  8. Paean
  9. Integrity
  10. Magnolia part II
  11. Sinner beyond defile
  12. Shedding

Review

There is a lot to like about this album from Maltese metallers Slit. While Encyclopaedia Metallum lists Slit has “thrash/groove metal” the style of this album puts me more in mind of early industrial death metallers Fear Factory fused with Obituary (also death metal).

The production and mixing on this album is superb. The mids and bass are full but punchy. The riffs are ‘chunky’, the vocals are gruff but not distracting. This is one heavy, HEAVY album that stops and starts which allows the riffs space to breathe. Slit have a great sense of timing.

From start to finish this album captured my attention. This isn’t an album to play as background music, this demands a proper listen.

I’ve noticed over the course of this project that the albums that I like most I write less about, as if I want to keep the details to myself; as though I can’t fully sum up my appreciation in words. I guess that’s what I have here. If you are into modern thrash, mildly industrial death, or metalcore then I urge you to seek this album out.

Conclusion

This is an album that I expect to be listened to for a while to come. Each listen reveals something new, nuances that I hadn’t noticed on the last spin (if indeed you can spin mp3s).

I’m impressed. More like this please.

Review score: 98%